In the Footsteps of My Ancestors

June 30 – September 16, 2018

MAIN GALLERY

Members Only Opening Reception: Thursday, June 28, 7 – 9 pm
Artist Presentation: 6:30 – 7:30 pm (ticketed event with limited seating)

Enjoy a relaxing evening with fellow Museum members while previewing the exhibition before it opens to the public. Tickets for the artist presentation available to members only (seating limited). Call (970) 962-2410 to reserve your seats by June 25.

Exhibit Admission: $5, free for Museum members
Admission Free Days: Thursday, July 12 and Tuesday, September 4

Free admission during Night on the Town on Fridays, July 13, August 10, and September 14 from 5 – 9 pm

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith is one of the finest indigenous talents in the United States. Smith is an artist with extraordinary aesthetic, intellectual, and curatorial achievements to her credit. She mines her cross-cultural experience and Salish-Kootenai identity, and spans cultures with powerful, idiosyncratic results of high aesthetic caliber. Few Native artists have worked with such grace, inventiveness, and aesthetic success between cultures and art worlds. Smith has an international reputation with a strong, clear body of work. She has earned her leading standing among women artists and Native American artists while simultaneously aligning both of these often still marginalized groups more closely with the mainstream art world.

Including 44 paintings and works on paper from the artist’s collection, Yellowstone Art Museum’s permanent collection, and other private collectors, this exhibition will examine recurrent themes in Smith’s body of work including conflict, compassion, peace, the cycle of life, irony, and identity. Smith has always operated on a cusp – culturally, temporally, aesthetically, and from a gender perspective – which gives her work an attention-getting vitality, originality, and relevance. Her role in the shift toward deepening respect for Native American contemporary art in its own right has been significant. She describes herself as a “cultural arts worker.” Smith also has credits as a curator, writer, speaker, and leader in the arts.

This exhibition was organized by Yellowstone Art Museum Made possible by a grant from Colorado Creative Industries.

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Exhibit Programming

Lecture with Jaune Quick-to-See Smith
Thursday, June 28, 6:30 pm
Foote Auditorium
Tickets available ONLY to museum members. Please call to reserve your member-only ticket by June 25 (seating is limited).

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith has had over one hundred solo exhibitions in 28 states. Her work is in the permanent collection of institutions such as Yellowstone Art Museum, Missoula Art Museum, Detroit Institute, Denver Art Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Walker Art Center.

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Gallery Interactive Community Exhibit
Main Gallery
Free activity with $5 paid gallery admission

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith is an artist who is known for using layers of different materials in her work. Gallery visitors will be invited to use collage and assemblage elements to create a layered creation of text, image and other visual elements. Adapted from the Yellowstone Art Museum Education Department, this interactive gallery activity will serve as a community exhibit. Build your own collage or connect with one that is already there! Tell your own story or add to the stories of our community.

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Program with CSU Native American Cultural Center
Thursday, August 23, 5 – 7 pm (5:30 pm reception, 6 pm film screening and panel)
Foote Auditorium
FREE

Colorado State University’s Native American Women’s Circle student group created a collaborative short film highlighting Indigenous students’ experiences around common misconceptions about Indigenous peoples. Following the film, we will host a panel discussion featuring students from the film as well as staff from the Native American Cultural Center, and will discuss their experiences related to stereotypes, challenges, and strengths faced by Indigenous students and communities.